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't use violence against his people. does it show how little leverage the u.s. has in yemen now? >> reporter: we are seeing more and more the past few weeks, it looks as though the u.s. has more leverage. we saw a comment from the president in the last few weeks saying the u.s. shouldn't meddle. foreigners shouldn't intervene in the affairs there. there was a call between john brennan, the assistant to the president for homeland security. he was there telling yemen president they were praising him for his initiative and make sure they protect the protesters there. they agreed to that. today, you are seeing a crackdown, again. this is worrying to the u.s. there should be dialogue in yemen. the president is saying there should be. but we are seeing more and more violence in the streets. >> joining us live from abu dabi. that you know for that. >>> a critical and dangerous situation is going on right now with two nuclear plants damaged by the massive quake in japan. to make a bad situation worse, an explosion at one of them today. we have the latest coming up. [ male announcer ] 95
continues, with more efforts to cool down the reactors. what they are doing is using chinook helicopters to drop sea water. they have been addressing the media, just about one hour ago. here is what was said. >> the two leaders talked to each other on the phone, from 10:22 a.m. to 10:52 a.m. president barack obama expressed symphony -- sympathy, and he also offered support, including support related to nuclear power plants and also mid-term and long-term rehabilitation initiatives. prime minister kan expressed gratitude to president obama for his support. the self-defense forces and police, all of those who are concerned are doing their best, and the prime minister can explain this to president obama. the people in charge of disaster relief and operations are doing their best, and also, the two leaders agreed to cooperate on the nuclear power plant issues. >> mr. edano has really been the face of this crisis, addressing the media every day, and here is what he had to say about the latest thames -- the latest attempts to drop the sea water to cool them. >> to drop water from the air, and
in washington president obama is facing lots of criticism for the u.s. mission in libya. two and a half hours from now he'll try to ease concerns about the operation's goals, its costs and the end game. his remarks coming a little over a week from the first coalition air strikes and critical time for opposition fighters on the ground. gadhafi's troops wiped out some of the gains but in recent days coalition air strikes have helped rebels seize some of the northern stays. now to reza sayah with more on benghazi. what's the latest information, ressa, that you are getting. >> reporter: these forces had an impressive three days capturing five towns from the gadhafi forces. today they finally met some resistance, the first in about 72 hours. that resistance coming in the city of sirte, gadhafi's birthplace, his hometown. when you talk to opposition officials here they anticipated a fights there and they got t.rebel figorces pushing back a one rebel fighter telling cnn that he and a group of other fighters cornelio sommaruga gadhafi soldiers waving a right flag, that, of course, the universal signa
military action. how far will the u.s. and its allies go to enforce a u.n.-authorized no-fly zone? also this hour, a new level of crisis at japan's crippled snuk power plant. as the race goes on to heat down those reactors, officials now say this disaster is on par with the worst nuclear accident in u.s. history and mile after mile of destruction, search and rescue crews barely know where to begin. we're with emergency teams risking their own lives to save others. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> president obama says the world has given moammar gadhafi ample warning that his bloody assault on rebel forces will not stand. mr. obama putting gadhafi on notice just a while ago, a day after the u.n. security council approved the use of force to protect civilians in libya. the president says the libyan leader would commit atrocities if left unchecked and thousands of people could die. >> these terms are not subject to negotiation. if gadhafi does not comply with the resolution, the international community will impose consequences. and the resolution will be enforce enforc
are without food, clean water and electricity. we have team coverage from the epicenter of thedy sast to the u.s. greg, what is the latest? >> a cold dark night here in the fishing village and the folks probably went to bed thinking of what the prime minister had to say. he told them it would take determination to get them through this. just up the coast, the nuclear complex with so much problems in the past couple of days, today, another reactor facing the possibility of a meltdown. they say they are in control of the situation. but the evacuation from the region around the reactors continues and the possibility of poisoning from radioactivity also going forward. dozens are testing positive for that. now to the number. there is one official here, in one region who said yesterday that 10,000 people were missing. now he is saying he feels that 10,000 people are dead in his region alone. that may add to the figure. we traveled today and we notice shortages are a problem. of food, of fuel and power in this village, of everything people need to get by. that is why relief is rushing to this area. tod
they were also telling us that no aircraft had been used for several days that is correct they had not been bombing civilians, that aircraft had not been part of the flight and what we were hearing were being told that rumors that nobody could substantiate. now confirmation by our own reports in the east of the country who have witnessed this incident taking place, obviously there's complete variance with what the government here is saying and calls into question -- as of yesterday calls into question government claims that they're observing this cease-fire. also yesterday we heard from gofrt appeals coming from china, malta, germany, and turkey. they've been appealing for them to witness the situation here, to show that the government was observing the cease-fire. they said that they were choosing these particular countries because they thought they would be more sympathetic to libya's case, but it appears to indicate the intense frustration at the isolation that libya is feeling at the moment, that they are choosing these countries and appealing for them to urgently to come to li
dan balz, thank you for helping us remember him. you can join us again next sunday morning for another critical look at theedia. "state of the union with candy crowley" begins right now. candy will have an update on japan, the japanese ambassador to the united states will be among her guests. >>> the known death toll in japan's earthquake tsunami disaster is now over 1,200. the government official believes more than 10,000 people may have died in one region alone. and this morning, the possibility of meltdowns in two nuclear reactors. the japanese government believes there could be a second hydrogen explosion similar to one yesterday building another housing reactor. 200,000 people have been evacuated. at least nine tested positive and health authorities are already distributing iodine tablets as an antidote to radiation. public broadcasting in japan told evacuees to close doors and windows, put a wet towel over their nose and mouth and cover up. this morning the prime minister announced rolling power outages throughout the country and called this japan's most difficult mom
, tsunami warnings for at least 20 countries. and hawaii and the west coast of the u.s. under warnings as well. let me tell you about this quake. a devastating one, one of the most powerful earthquakes ever recorded. it was an 8.9 magnitude quake. it hit off the coast of japan overnight. there have been several powerful aftershocks being felt, up to 7.0 in magnitude. the quake was centered 300 miles from tokyo, but it was felt in tokyo. buildings swayed. take a look at these pictures. our bureau there in tokyo as well. some of our co-workers being thrown around at times as well. this is just one of the views inside. people poured out onto the streets afterwards. they say it's a city in chaos right now. the danger we have now, the concern, a tsunami. it did trigger a tsunami, massive waves, some as high as 30 feet, starting to come ashore in places. this wall of water is starting to bring with it -- it's washing away cars, boats, buildings. looks like lava almost making its way through. here's the most stunning picture. waves of mud and debris can be seen like lava flowing through some
is on the way from the u.s. and other countries. with so many roads damaged, the challenge will be getting all of that aid to the people who need it. more than 200 aftershocks have jolted japan since the quake hit, and some of them quite powerful. several happened near a nuclear plant where one reactor has been overheating since friday's earthquake. >> officials say an explosion there involved an outer building, not any of the reactors. people living within 12 miles of the plant have been told to evacuate. before nightfall, more than 3,000 people were rescued across the country. the death toll has topped 900. and officials now fear it could grow higher. we're getting new video in from japan and it really is something to watch. take a look. >> ireporter aaron sent this to us. he was attending a college graduation at a theater in tokyo when the earthquake hit. the theater roof collapsed, but aaron and many others were able to get out, and we hope to talk to aaron lace live as soon as we're able to get a connection with him. so stay with us for his story to match some of those remarkable images.
arriving in tokyo within the past 24 or so is martin savidge. he's joining us now by phone. last time john spoke with you, you were trying to make your way from tokyo on a flight to get somewhere north of there. how are you doing? where are you? >> well, you know what, we're still trying to do the same thing, fred. we've just gotten into vans and we're going to make our way to the domestic airport. and it is hoped from there that we catch a plight in about maybe two hours. this will be a domestic flight that might take us db leapfrog us 150, 200 miles north. as you know the roads and of course the rail system is out up in that region. so what we're trying to do is fly as far as we can north and we still know we're eventually going to have to go on road and probably take hours after that point. so that's the point. right now, though, as you said, it is very early in the morning here in japan and it is going to be a critical day of the rescue effort really being ramped up. it ramped up yesterday and it will be more so today as they continue to flpluck them from t rooftops. two natural disast
evening to our viewers joining us in the west. while the japanese deal with a staggering humanitarian crisis, they are now engaging in a last-resort effort to stop perhaps multiple meltdowns at nuclear reactors. and today president obama had to reassure the american public especially those along the west coast, that these fears of some sort of radioactive cloud coming across the pacific just aren't true. here now the latest on the disaster in japan. desperate measures now under way to lessen the nuclear disaster. while tonight japanese officials are saying they have rare good news of some levels stabilizing, late today we got the first look at the reactors close up. this new video of a helicopter fly-over showing the destruction. then there are the numbers. just under 5700 dead, just under 10,000 missing and over three-quarters of a million people surviving without electricity in near freezing cold. thousands of people, including americans, continue to flee japan. we want to get the very it latest now and begin our reporting with nbc's robert bazell in tokyo. bob, good evening. >> rep
todd showed us just what they are up against. >> reporter: we're here in this town of ofunato which was devastated. these guys are courageous, they go into the structures all the time knowing they could come down at any minute. you can see endless whole blocks of nothing but rubble, this is what they guys have to come and try to sift through to find people alive. i will show you one stark contrast. you can see up that hill, that's what high ground does in a tsunami. it can save those structures, save the people in them. but down here, they just almost didn't have a chance. just on the other side of these buildings is an inlet that comes in from the ocean. so it kind of funneled the tsunami waters in here and rescue workers tell us that it made the waters even stronger. just incredible force that came through that funnel, through that inlet and swept over this entire area. i'm here with chief chris shoft. when you come upon a scene like this, how do you not get overwhelmed? >> if you look at it in a big picture, it is easy to get overwhelmed. we break it down to small coordinates and
. they'll include stan grant in tokyo for us, kyung lau is in sendai, anna coren is there as well. elise labatt watching things for us in washington, d.c. and josh levs. we're keeping a close eye on sendai, japan, a city of about a million people now in tatters. cnn international correspondent anna coren has had a tough time getting there, actually. but she's there now live with an update on the ground. anna, what can you tell us? >> reporter: well, already it's pretty quiet here in sendai at the moment. the city is quite deserted. i think many people are just trying to get out. a lot of sendai has been blacked out as far as power and water goes. there are pockets which are up and running from where we are. the majority of the city, it is out. so people are wanting to get out. they're leaving the city. they have been a number of of shocks as well. a tsunami warning is still in place over much of the east coast of japan. so people wanting to get out, wanting to get away from the coastline that has brought so much pain and suffering the last couple of days. >> and what are supplies like th
pitch black. there are a lot of streets with all sorts of debris. us a move closer to the north you can see where the water may have been two or three inches and became four or five or six feet. one car was literally spiked into a fence as if it was skewered. we haven't been up in this region in the daylight. >> kelly: based on what you've seen and what you just described as getting cold and weather getting very cold right now, one thing comes to mind. fear and panic. how will the people avoid that. are they getting help to avoid that? >> reporter: they are but it's tough to get around to the people. you don't know about the fear and panic because you can't get to them physically. it's important to get search and rescuers to them tomorrow. >> kelly: that is adam housley laying it out in what the people are facing. >> jamie: and it's a scramble as they try to deal with the damaged nuclear power plants, the government is declaring a state of atomic power emergency. it's asking russia to raise energy sfleismt was the scene at one of the country's major refineries, up in flames. the prime m
>> steve: all right. ainsley, thank you for joining us. >> ainsley: thanks for having me. happy st. patrick's day to you and your family. wear your green this morning. >> steve: the news continues, "america's news room "right now on the fox news channel. >> ainsley: bye. martha: massive and desperate new assault by land and air. helicopters range down water on the fukushima nuclear plant. those efforts now suspended because the japanese officials say those were falling short. the crews were attacking the spent fuel with those water cannons trying to bring the water temperatures down within the reactors. that has not been successful. in a cool twist of irony, freezing temperatures are now a problem. snow hammering rescue efforts. on this thursday morning, st. patrick's day, i'm martha mccallum. rick: i'm rick folbaum. these are the four nuclear reactors at the fukushima plant. they are 40 kilometers away from the epicenter of the territory cake. first an explosion at reactor number 1, then reactor number 3. then two days later an explosion ripped through that reactor number 3 and si
catastrophe in japan. i'm wolf blitzer. john vos is joining us over in the cnn center in atlanta. a lot of news to cover. let me give our viewers the highlights of what's going on right now. it's now just after 7:00 a.m. saturday in japan. survivors of the strongest earthquake recorded in that country's history are seeing the enormous destruction in the harsh light of day, and they are still being shaken to the core. two powerful new tremors measuring higher than a magnitude of 6 struck within the last hour alone, after the 8.9 monster quake hit japan friday afternoon unleashing a huge tsunami. japanese media reporting that the death toll could be higher than 1,000. hundreds of people may be missing. some may be trapped alive or buried in homes that were simply washed away. the tsunami sent water rushing sever six miles inland. one area of deep concern right now. japanese authorities are trying to cool down the temperature inside a nuclear power plant rattled by the quake. president obama says the united states is helping to monitor the plant for possible radiation leaks. he also sent h
trucks, usually used to combat airplane fires, to shoot water from a safe distance. the entire operation is a race to get water into the severely damaged reactors before the fuel explodes. so far the radiation levels have been high enough to only be a serious threat to the workers at the site. still, the japanese government has ordered people living within 12 miles of the site to evacuate. those within 18 miles to stay indoors. the u.s. government says its residents within 50 miles should leave. >> we think it's a prudent measure to follow the evacuation based on how we would handle a situation like that in the united states. >> reporter: there are six reactors at the site. in unit 1 an explosion destroyed part of an outer building. in unit 2 there may have been an explosion rupturing the containment facility and possibly letting radioactive fuel escape. unit 3 was the target of today's water drops. it too had an explosion of the outer building and it also has exposed fuel rods. unit 4 was shut down for maintenance when the earthquake struck, but it became the subject of a controversy wh
: for a check of the weather, let us turn to meteorologist, brian van aken. >> brian: 8 chance of rain and it is going to be confined to the north bay. a little bit of a quiet rain-a chance. otherwise, partly /mostly cloudy. some breaks of sunshine temperatures and to the upper 50s and low 60s. not a particularly warm day. 58 and a san rafael. look for low 60s near the bay. 60s in the south bay, and the east bay. antioch, concord. 62 degrees. that rain, you can see that the forecast model is putting it into the north bay. this afternoon perhaps the wind shield wipers 32 times. significant rainfall later this week. the windshield wipers a couple of times today >> isabel: more of the tsunami coverage and how it impacted a small, north ccalifornia town. and it is still a bit overcast 60s. we will be back. ñ >> isabel: 7:10. this is video from pacifica. in anticipation of the tsunami that was traveling at the speed of an airplane. and beaches, peers were closed off. and low lying areas were voluntarily evacuated but no damage. in the pacific beach, the creek high was open. with waves only
for giving us some of your time this afternoon. >> thanks for having me. >> ruth marcus. that will do it for us today. i'm dylan ratigan. "hardball with chris matthews" starts right now. >>> escape from japan. let's play "hardball." >>> good evening. i'm christ matthews in washington. happy st. patrick's day. leading off tonight, high anxiety. here's how desperate it's gotten at that nuclear plant over in japan. authorities have been reduced to dumping water from helicopters and spraying water from fire trucks in a last-ditch effort to cool those spent fuel rods. in a moment, we'll hear from a nuclear power regulatory commissioner and get a report from the ground in japan. >>> also, credibility gap. the widening chasm between what the japanese government is saying and what we can believe. it happened at three mile island. it really happened at chernobyl and now it's happening at japan, officials playing down the dangers. we'll try to bridge the credibility gap tonight. >>> plus, the nuclear disaster has once again turned u.s. public opinion, obviously, against nuclear power. could hav
, and the west coast. it appears the u.s. has escaped significant damage. we'll check in with meteorologist jeff ranieri in san francisco in a moment. first, joining me on the phone from tokyo is our producer, arata yamamoto. hello, arata. >> reporter: hi. >> there have been more than 100 aftershocks of a magnitude of five or greater, i believe. are you feeling these? >> reporter: some of them. not all. i am 188 miles south of the epicenter. ones i feel here are not as many as that. >> and are you seeing any further signs of damage where you are? >> reporter: not here in tokyo. i think the damage that was caused in tokyo, we heard reports of a walkway collapsing and we have reports of death here but that was from the first earthquake, not from the following aftershock. >> i believe the road system, as well, has been damaged in tokyoingtokyo i , a number of high ways closed, correct? >> reporter: the roads are closed. and what's compounded that is the fact that up until around midnight most of the train system was shut down which meant that everyone, people working in tokyo on a friday, busy frid
for joining us. i am megan pringle. >> i am charley crowson. before we get started, your orange -- nosh you like the orange. >> i like the orange tie. ms awareness week. we are excited about this. all week you will find out how much orange we have. but we have guest to talk about why it's so important to raise awareness it's tough disease and close to my heart. my mother has it. and we will hear about what you can do to razz awareness and raise -- raise awareness and funds for a cure. we hope you join us for the ms walk. there's a bunch from april 2nd to april 19th. we have the information you need to know. >>> a wonderful cause. >>> also, it's the springtime. many of us dusting off the winter's chill getting ready for the spring cleaning. you want to do everything, the nooks and crannies and shelves and cabinets. remember your electronics. coming up, john with best buy is at the geek squad has tips. did you know windex could hurt your computer monitor in. >> you know i didn't know that. but i am sure that i need to clean mine. so i will find out what it is. >> don't utes -- don't use winde
room." >>> now, breaking news. urgent new teams to cool down an overheated reactor. now the u.s. government is stepping in to evacuate possibly thousands of americans from the country and get them away from any nuclear danger. secretary of state hillary clinton tells our wolf blitzer she's worried about the health and saved of americans in japan even as she heads home from tunis tunisia. i'm candy crowley, you're in "the situation room." nuclear experts say the new attempt to douse an overheated reactor has been somewhat effective. helicopters, fire trucks and police water cannons all have been deployed. we are told that radiation levels dipped, but they are still high, so the frarchtic work to prevent a full-scale meltdown goes on. cnn's anna coren is nil tokyo. just bring us up to date. >> well, candidate, it's entering the seventh day of this crisis, and now at the fukushima daiichi plant trying to bring this situation under control. we saw the pictures of the helicopters, trying to spray water onto the reactors. those crews had to get out because of the radiation levels incr
at three mile island gave us the assurance that we were getting fact that is we needed in order to make key decisions. i don't care how good a decision-maker you are. if you don't have the right facts it's not going to prevail. >> sir, when you would -- as you're watching this, what is the advice that you would want to impart to japanese officials that are now having to assess this disaster? >> probably the key thing is just to keep pushing and in effect cross examining every possible source in order to get a reliable set of facts you can use to make decisions. there are involved technical questions here that you require the need of experts and obviously they have flooded the area with all kinds of expertise and advice. but it's when it comes to making difficult decisions like i'm sure the decision to evacuate was you've got to be sure that you've got a firm grip on precisely what's going on. >> for a lot of people watching this, they are reminded that there are 104 nuclear power plants in america. does the situation in japan change your perspective at all about nuclear energy and its uses
're following all the breaking news. cnn's isha sze say is joining us from cnn international. i've got to tell you, so much news. i've been a reporter for a long time, but i can't remember a time when there's been so many breaking news stories of such enormity happening, isha, at the same time. >> absolutely, wolf, no doubt about it. we are, of course, closely following the events taking place in japan that are rapidly unfolding, but as you mentioned you are there in cairo with the secretary of state hillary clinton, an important visit there. many in the arab world watching closely to see as she meets with egypt's new leaders, wolf. >> it's a critically important trip she's having. there's by no means a done deal here in egypt that everything is going to work out just fine. just a little while ago down in tahrir square, and i was there. there was gunfire and gunshots going out as some coptic christian protesters were running, hundreds of people running on the street. still tense. a lot more on this part of the story. what's happening in libya now. gadhafi is running and moving quickly supposed
're following right now. the japanese ambassador to the united states. he is here with us. you heard the story. let me repeat it, mr. ambassador, because i know you speak for the japanese government. a meltdown may be under way at one of fukushima's daiichi nuclear power reactors. an official with japan's nuclear and industrial safety agency told cnn. quhak you tell us about this, mr. ambassador? >> chief cabinet secretary of japan has made an announcement in the press conference about this issue. there was a concern about this reactor. we have confirmed that there was a blow-up. it was not a blow-up of reactor, nor container. it was a blow-up of the outer building. so there was no leakage of radioactive material. we are now trying to cope with the situation by putting water into that -- >> saltwater. >> yeah, saltwater into the reactor and there are some other issues with other reactors as well. which needs also an injection of water or taking up vapor, because of increasing pressure into the container. and we're now working on it. >> but is it fair to say, mr. ambassador, that a meltdown may
of the outer slopes are very, very -- a bit misleading. >> gerard fryer with us on the line. we appreciate you giving us time and perspective. we will continue to check in with you this morning. >> we're going to take a quick break and "american morning," special edition, covering the latest on this earthquake and tsunami. we'll be right back. wrench? wrench. basic. preferred. at meineke i have options on oil changes. and now i get free roadside assistance with preferred or supreme. my money. my choice. my meineke. time to face the pollen that used to make me sneeze. but with zyrtec® liquid gels, i get fast, 24-hour allergy relief. so i feel better by the time we tee off. zyrtec® liquid gels work fast, so i can love the air®. the one time of year red lobster creates so many irresistible ways to treat yourself to lobster. like our new lobster-and-shrimp trio with a parmesan lobster bake, our decadent lobster lover's dream with both sweet maine and buttery rock lobster tails and eleven more choices, each served with a salad and unlimited cheddar bay biscuits. come celebrate lobsterfest right
, and the u.s. are scrambling to enforce a no-fly zone over libya now that the u.n. security council has authorized all necessary measures. cnn international correspondent nic robertson is live in tripoli. good morning, nic. >> reporter: good morning, christine. well, we've already heard from the deputy foreign minister here who says he doesn't expect immediate air strikes here, but wouldn't say what preparations the army or anyone else in the country may be taking to defend the country with this new u.n. resolution. when he was asked about the cease-fire that the resolution calls for, he seemed to indicate that the government here was going to take some time to do that. they didn't have anyone to negotiate with that they would put it in place. but this was something that was going to take time. seemed to hint that the army here may plan to continue with some of its offensive. that offensive was going on in the east, and we have no updated information from that front line this morning, christine. >> does this u.n. resolution paint -- does it paint them into a corner, gadhafi and his alli
. breaking news tonight. thanks for inviting us into your home, fair, balanced, and unafraid. >> shepard: continuing coverage of breaking news from libya as muammar qaddafi branches brand new attacks and the united nations takes brand new action. and here in japan the desperate effort to cool the nuclear contractor. an extension cord more than half a mile long could provide the best chance yet of prevent ago nuclear breakdown. this is breaking news now on fox news channel, i'm shepard smith. the news starts now. >> shepard: they are attacking the problem from the air and the ground. part of the effort to cool down those fuel rods and reactors. >> even as japanese responders continue to do heroic work, we know that the damage to the nuclear reactors poses a substantial risk. >> shepard: and officials say what happens in the hours ahead is absolutely critical. plus, a new move to pull americans out of the danger zone. >> i'm concerned because i really don't know the situation about the radiation. >> shepard: tonight, the escape from japan. and good friday morning from tokyo where there is
about radiation poisoning as well. >> dave: thanks for being with us for 8 hours this weekend, log onto foxandfriends.com for the "after the show" show, back at 6:00 a.m., tomorrow, for 6:00 a.m., tomorrow, for continuing coverage. captioning by, closed captioning services, inc. >> eric: a "fox news alert," could japan be teetering on the edge of a nuclear disaster, reeling from the devastating earthquake and tsunami? the nuclear concerns are bringing new worries, this morning that the crisis in the country could get worse and there could be another big earthquake. hello, i'm eric sean, on this busy sunday morning. >> jamie: i'm jamie colby. japan's prime minister is now calling the crisis there, one of the worst since the endf world war ii. they are worried about possible melt downs and potential for an explosion at nuclear reactors, along the northeast earn coast. and, more than 170,000 people evacuating the area, where authorities fear now more than 10,000 people have already died from the quake and a wall of water that rushed right through. david piper on the ground, streaming live
agency. he joins us live from tokyo. what is the status of that system? >> reporter: we are really getting into unchartered territory here. the government called it a nuclear state of emergency. look at the chronology. we had the massive quake yesterday. then it shut down as they normally do in a situation like that. then it xexasperated it. the steam was coming off earlier. some radioactivity material was released with the steam. first it was a mile, then it was stretched to 10 kilometers. now it's doubled. they are talking 12 miles, 20 kilometers. this has continued to grow throughout the day. this nuclear radioactive material is detected in the area. some indication there may be melting down of fuel inside there. then the explosion. the explosion happened a few hours ago. four people were injured in that. we are waiting to hear what the extent of those injuries would be. then pushed 12 miles. also the defense to go in and ail the elderly people from the area away. the government had been saying the risk from the radioactivity is small but if you hear from various analysts, it do
of course sending a massive amount of aid and the u.s. military. the u.s.s. ronald reagan, the carrier strike group has an aircraft carrier and a number of united states ships there assisting in the rescue efforts as well as using-- we saw this in hurricane katrina, of course, the military and coast card using the massive ships as basically floating hospitals where they have fresh water and dave you pointed out earlier, the des desalization process. >> and that's vital and 70 countries offered aid including china which is interesting because they've been very contentious for years and years, especially in the last couple, over an incident that international waters in japan, and we won't get into the particulars, however, china came to their aid and offered condolences, offered money and as we've pointed out, the united states appears to be leading the way and we're supposed to check in with the 7th fleet of the navy later on this morning what they're doing to help. >> alisyn: you can see already, food ap supplies are distributed by our military and meanwhile, satellite photos are just
>> thank you very much for joining us. >> for the first time since the earthquake and the tsunami devastated north eastern japan, american nuclear energy leaders are taking a different position regarding the safe of japan's crippled nuclear plant. >> the white house warned u.s. citizens to clear the area 50 miles around the plant. japan is just advising a 20-mile evacuation. the state department is telling citizens to rely on the united states for updates. nbc's bay area is tracking the effort to stop a nuclear meltdown. >> reporter: we are monitoring all the information coming and it is hard to make sense of all this. what we do know is that right now in the last hour, the focus has shifted to a reactor at that daiichi nuclear plant. that's one thing we're watching. we're watching the advisory for american to get a little farther away from that plant than was originally recommended. now, the japanese government did double the number of workers they're sending in, trying to find out what's happening within the plant. they are working by flashlight. they are pumping sea water in to
. a great interview. that's all for us tonight. >> i did too. >> that's all for tonight, and matthew and his bongoes. >>> good morning. anti-government protests are growing louder across the middle east today. more change could be on the way for the region. meanwhile, the international military forces are focusing right now on libya. also an apology in japan. after more workers are exposed to potentially deadly levels of radiation. and what's being blamed for this overexposure? a communications error. all this while fears grow that one reactor at that plant could be leaking. from the cnn center in atlanta, georgia, this is your cnn start morning. hello to you all. glad you could spent some part of your saturday morning with us. i'm t.j. holmes. i do want to start now, though, in japan with the growing concern over radiation levels in the ocean water around that damaged nuclear plant. radiation levels in the air at least seem to be decreasing. paula hancock's live for us in tokyo. hello to up. what are they saying about this possible leak of one of those reaccour reactor cores. that's a key c
people are stranded in their homes. >>> good morning, thank you for joining us on this tuesday march 22nd i'm pam cook. >> and i'm dave clark. let's check weather and traffic. here is steve. >> we do have cloudy skies. light rain showers around. nothing too heavy right now. it is a sign of things to come for later on. just hit and miss like take a little paint brush and flicking it there. you can see a couple showers there on the caldecott tunnel. skyline and also toward m rain county. the rain and wind will pick up. look for a cloudy to mostly cloudy stayday. here is sal. >>> right now traffic looks good on westbound 92 heading out to the high-rise. see the live picture of the san mateo bridge it looks pretty nice. and this mornings drive looks okay on highway 101. a complete traffic update is ahead. let's go back to the desk. >>> overnight japan had its strongest after shocks in more than a week. it was a magnitude 6.6 quake that hit the east coast just after 3:00 p.m. local time japan. it was located 182 miles off the coast of sendai. two hours later a 6.4 quake hit further south. 30 m
alaska, and those trillions of cubic feet of natural gas could be brought out of the ground and used to take care of our energy needs to a very large degree. as a matter of fact, the coal shale -- let's put that chart up there -- the coal chail that we have, they. -- shale that we have, they estimate it would create 1.8 trillion to eight trillion barrels of oil right here in this country and it would immediately reduce our dependency on foreign oil. and you think the saudis and others wouldn't lower their price per barrel very quickly if they thought we were producing that you're just not paying attention. if they thought we were becoming energy independent they would want to keep their market share and lower their prices as quickly as possible. and then you talk about coal itself. we have tremendous resources of coal. 584.5 billion tons our reserves in coal, the blue places you see on the map is four trillion tons of coal. now, they say that will hurt the environment. well, we got to make sure we protect the environment and we got scrubbers on the generating plants and all kinds of
. they continue yet again today. good morning. good to have you along with us. welcome, allison. >> the images out of japan are jaw dropping. this is a buddhist temple rocking back and forth from the sheer jolt of the quake. rescue and relief efforts are now underway. millions of people are left without food, water and electricity for days. japanese officials near thousands of people may be dead. bill: we have julian from sendai in northern japan where the tsunami came onshore near this nuclear power plants. what's the latest from there? >> i have been down by the sendai airport watching the japanese military collecting body parts from the paddy fields around the airport. the power is out in large parts of the city. there are huge fires along the waterfronts where the petroleum and refinery facilities have gone up. inland it's getting back to normal in that people are going back to where their houses used to be and they are trying to salvage what they can from the remains. homes are buckled, trees have been ripped up and shredded across the lands scape. it's a complete mess. . bill: it's mes he it
in the opening minutes of the day as the u.s. stock market reacts to the nuclear crisis. >>> i'm tamron hall. the "news nation" is following the latest on the nuclear emergency in japan where it is 3:00 a.m. local time. threat level is now being called a six out of seven by the french authority of nuclear safety. a watchdog group that monitors radiation safety. chernobyl, for some perspective here, was six out of serve. three mile island was rated a five. latest explosion in unit two of the fukushima plant may be the worst yet. international atomic energy agency says there's evidence it breached the primary containment shell. that means more radiation could be leaking from that unit. the iaea says radiation levels at site have been decreasing. people living within 20 kilometers of the plant have been evacuated and are lining up to be scanned for radiation. a no-fly zone has been established around the crippled nuclear plant for 30 kilometers. global economic fears, the stock market plummeted today because of the nuclear concerns and right now the dow, let's take a look at it, is down 178 poi
is working frantically to prevent nuclear meltdowns. greg palkot joins us live north of tokyo from the latest on the recovery efforts. >> reporter: that japanese prime minister went on to say it's going to take the determination of people like the folks in these coastal town in northeastern japan and people throughout the region to deal with the situation. they are getting hit on all fronts. as you noted there is a nuclear catastrophe up the coast from where we are. today we saw another nuclear reactor stricken by the earthquake that hit here on friday. sea water had to be poured into the reactor to cool it down to avoid a full scale meltdown. still evacuation of the region around this nuclear reactor complex continues and the screening for radiation poisoning also continues as the death toll builds. yesterday we heard from a police official in one region in this area, he said, hey, i think there is about 10,000 people from my region. he said today, i think there is about 10,000 people dead in my region. people are surviving as we move around this area, they are finding harder and harder to s
libya and authorization to use "all necessary measures." this is muammar gaddafi vowing to retake the rebel held city of benghazi, offering amnesty to those who surrender and no mercy to others. only hours after he warned foreign powers that any outside attack would trigger retaliation and destabilization of the region. but first, we turn to japan. where emergency workers are feverishly trying to cool down overheating fuel rods at the earthquake and tsunami-stricken nuclear plant. a u.n. nuclear official says the situation is "very serious." but appears to be stable. for now. the u.s. authorized the first evacuations of americans out of japan and president obama says he has asked for a comprehensive review of u.s. nuclear plant safety. correspondent greg palkot is in japan with the latest. >> reporter: there were desperate measures thursday in the fukushima nuclear plant in northeastern japan. helicopters doused water on overheating reactors to avoid a catastrophic core meltdown. the facility was sprayed down with more water from fire trucks. while authorities say there is some st
, america. joining us is "world news" anchor, diane sawyer, is who is there in sendai, japan, where the scope of the destruction is staggering. aftershocks still rocking the region. >> dealing with two crises. humanitarian. and an urgent disaster, to avoid a nuclear emergency. there was a third partial meltdown overnight. 11 injured in the blast. and after american officials detected radiation onboard "the uss ronald reagan," it was moved offshore. and nuclear experts still believe that the chances of a full-scale meltdown are remote. but the chances of a nuclear disaster, even worse than we feared. >> the death toll may top 10,000, with reports of thousands of bodies washing ashore. the disaster has also dealt a powerful blow to japan's economy. their stock market plunged overnight, as the government announced it would pump more than $200 billion into the economy. and we have new pictures for you to see. an aftershock this morning. when you see the images, you can see the power lines shaking in the snow. and the road splitting apart down below. again, this in this morning. we have
in the city there. adam, what can you tell us about the nuclear concerns there? >> reporter: yeah, here is at the fish market, the japanese coast, 70 miles away from the first reactor you're talking about, the one that caused the problem the last couple of days before the new reactor up the close from there caused problems and people were talking about the threat at that does exist around this entire region because the fact you have three separate reactors that people are extremely worried about. that evaluation area we're told is about 15 miles in circumference. and up to 200,000 people for sure have already been evacuated and the government says maybe as many as 300,000 will be evacuated and we do know that there are at least 19 scientists on at least one site where they're going through and checking each person being brought out to see what kind of radiation con tamation they've been exposed to. >> yeah, adam, we've been seeing video of some of that radiation testing going on. where do you put more than 200,000 people who were evacuated in the middle of an earthquake zone? >> well, w
the pacific, including hawaii and the west coast. we have extended coverage, now, from japan and the u.s. >>> good morning, everyone. thanks for being with us on this very busy news day. a major disaster is unfolding in japan, after a megaearthquake hit overnight. >> now, the quake has triggered a tsunami in the northern part of the country. a 13-foot wall of water, washing away cars, busses, buildings, homes. incredible footage. >> tsunami warnings are posted for most of the pacific, including hawaii, where the coast guard is standing by. a powerful quake was centered around the area of sendai. but it rocked buildings in tokyo, hundreds of miles away. akiko fujita joins us from tokyo this morning. akiko, what is the latest? >> reporter: we are getting new numbers. we now know there are 18 people confirmed dead. that's from our partner out here, nhk. 18 people confirmed dead. and 60 people injured in tokyo alone. keep in mind that tokyo is hours away from the epicenter. 60 people injured in tokyo. we're not getting numbers out of northern japan where the epicenter was. but the numbers ex
and the crash of a u.s. military jet in the east. and we talk to libya's ambassador to the united states, ali suleiman aujali, who denounced moammar qaddafi last month. >> ifill: then, margaret warner looks at rifts within the nato alliance about the libya mission. >> brown: from japan, we get the latest on the cleanup in the hard-hit city of sendai. >> it might not seem much to you, but believe me it's a huge step that you now can actually drive up at the airport's departure terminal. >> ifill: and judy woodruff interviews japan's ambassador to the u.s., ichiro fujisaki. >> brown: special correspondent steve sapienza reports from bangladesh on the struggle to meet the basic needs of an exploding population. >> dahka is one of the world's fastest growing cities and one of the poorest. with 2,000 newcomers daily the struggle to find clean water in the slums often has life threatening consequences. >> ifill: and ray suarez examines what a merger between at&t and t-mobile would mean for consumers and the wireless industry. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshou
far. there is a tsunami warning in hawaii and parts of the u.s. west coast today friday, march hawaii and parts of the u.s. west coast today friday, march 11, 2011. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> welcome to "today" on this friday morning. i'm meredith vieira. >> i'm ann curry in for matt. this was a powerful earthquake. the images are stunning out of japan. it shows the tsunami sweeping inland, some 60 miles over farmland in sendai japan, 200 miles north of tok yochlt cars, housings, buildings being swept out with this massive wave. >> it started with an 8.9 magnitude quake that hit around 2:45 p.m. local time. it is the largest quake in japan's recorded history and the fifth strongest quake in the world in the past 111 years. there have been at least 19 aftershocks, including several stronger than last month's devastating quake in new zealand. a tsunami warning has been extended to include hawaii and parts along the u.s. west coast. >> when it starts to hit the continental shelf it moves as fast as 500 miles per hour, the speed of a jumbo jet. the first wave is exp
to themselves, to try to prevent another catastrophe in this country. brian? >> bob bazell starting us off in tokyo tonight. thanks. >>> this nuclear crisis just one prong of what japan is dealing with. this is just day five since the 9.0 earthquake, the fifth largest in recorded history. and the tsunami that followed. some facts that bear repeating, japan is about 10% smaller than california. this graphic shows the area of the country affected by moderate to severe shaking in the quake. here's the surface area we believe that was covered by water in the tsunami. the recovery hasn't even started in some places, where it's just rubble. the suffering goes on daily, and then the earth shook again violently today. nbc's lester holt today is in yamagata. lester, good evening. >> reporter: brian, good evening. we've chosen to give a wider berth of the exclusion zone around the plant, which is why we are now in the mountains west of sendai. with each bit of troubling news from the nuclear plant, the anxiety and fear ratchets up across this region. a lot of people fear they are not getting the str
europe as well. in the u.s., house democrats are calling on republicans on the safety issues possibly affecting american nuclear plants. we will have more on the questions being raised in the states later this hour. let's talk about this huge and very disturbing development, the 50 remaining workers leaving the plant. our chief sent correspondence is here. put into context this latest development. >> one piece of slightly good news at there were only taken out of their for 45 minutes. the cabinet secretary said that they had left the site. as soon as you left the site, there were a lot of news bulletins. they only work on for 45 minutes. until the radiation levels came down. apparently there is something more ominous. why didn't the regulation levels go up? the chief cabinet secretary said it could have been a breach in containment of reactor no. three. we have not heard much about reactor number three for a few days. there was a breach in containment of reactor no. two, the first breach of containment facility since chernobyl. >> people who don't do nuclear speak, help us understand.
morning, march 14th, 2011. captioning funded by cbs >>> and thanks for joining us on this monday morning. you can see, these are just some of the images which have been coming in, and frankly, they speak for themselves. they're just unimaginable. >> the devastation that we first saw here friday morning, and now, in the days after this disaster in japan, we continue to get more images, more video of exactly the impact that this is having on this nation and the people there. damage estimates in the tens of billions of dollars. but, of course you can't put a dollar figure on the loss of life. and the loss of life as the death toll estimates continue to increase hour by hour in the region. >> they do. and you hear those numbers and you know how well-prepared japan was to deal with something of this magnitude. frightening to think what could have been. the sheer magnitude of this catastrophe is frankly, staggering. the numbers barely begin to tell the story but they do give you a very good idea of where we stand at this hour. the official death toll is currently 2800. one po
see that across the eastern u.s., quite a variety of temperatures. binghamton, new york, 28 degrees. there is snow falling in new england this morning. and cape hatteras, 62 degrees. so not bad at all. the forecast for today, a lot of clouds. we'll have periods of rain and showers and then maybe this afternoon some thunderstorms, some of which could be strong. look for a high in d.c. today in the upper 50s and down to the south into the 60s. that's a look at the weather. now another check on this morning's rush hour traffic from julie wright. >>> a couple of things have popped up on us on the roads. on the outer loop from springfield in the direction of the wilson bridge, accident right here along the right side of the road. they are in the process of moving it. it is behind the overhead sign but they are in the process of moving it to the right shoulder. until that happens, big delays from van dorn over to eisenhower past the scene. then as you can see, the pace improves headed for the wilson bridge. but it's bunched up as you travel f
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